10 Things You'll Find at Superfest 2021 that You Won't Find Anywhere Else

Superfest 2021: Online!

It’s almost Superfest season, so mark your calendars for October 15, 16, and 17 and check out the descriptions below! This year we’ll have our festival exclusively online via a platform called Eventive, which will give us an opportunity to test some new formats and technologies, all with multiple forms of access in mind.

For more details about passes, opportunities for community conversations, and how it will all work, visit superfestfilm.comGet your tickets now!

Below, check out the films we'll be showing this year and things you'll find in them that you won't find anywhere else, but definitely should!

1. PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES AS MAIN CHARACTERS 

 

Still from “Dead End Drive” featuring a scruffy man in a neighborhood at sunrise. The sky is purple.

Dead End Drive

During the zombie apocalypse, one survivor finds a dead end that will hopefully lead him to salvation. (This project was created with over half of the cast and crew being comprised of people with disabilities, including the writer, all of the cast, and most of the producers.)

 

Alt text: Still from “Dead End Drive” featuring a scruffy man in a neighborhood at sunrise. The sky is purple.

 

Poster for “Aim Straight” featuring an animated child aiming a bow. He is clouded by black shadows. Text reads the film title and credits in white.

Aim Straight

When everyone’s laughing at you for being a lousy hunter, you’re in the woods being chased by a monster, and you only have one leg, you only have one choice: fight back!

 

Alt text: Poster for “Aim Straight” featuring an animated child aiming a bow. He is clouded by black shadows. Text reads the film title and credits in white.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A man sits on a patio surrounded by plants. He has light skin, brown hair and a beard. He is wearing a dark t-shirt and jeans. He is holding a watering can.

Here Comes Frieda
As yet another superstorm bears down on a desperate, weary city in the year 2040, a young blind woman seeks to redeem her winning sweepstakes ticket for a better life in a low Earth orbit paradise.

 

Alt text: Still from “Here Comes Frieda." A blind woman faces a hologram of another woman.

 

 

2. DISABILITY FRIENDSHIPS/RELATIONSHIPS

 

A young woman and a young man sit next to each other in a plant shop, smiles on their faces. The woman has Down syndrome

Not a Wallflower

Ben, a spritely young autistic man has a bright future. Except when it comes to his boss. And finding love. Will he bloom beyond the wallflowers?

 

Alt text: A young woman and a young man sit next to each other in a plant shop, smiles on their faces. The woman has Down syndrome.

 

Title still from “What If” featuring a white woman looking in her closet. Her room is decorated with rainbow lights. Text reads the film title.

What If?

After a bad break-up, Jess focuses on rebuilding her life and her self-esteem. Dating someone new might help, but what if it all goes wrong? Only one way to find out.

 

Alt text: Title still from “What If” featuring a white woman looking in her closet. Her room is decorated with rainbow lights. Text reads the film title.

 

 

 3. PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES WHO ARE ALSO QUEER AND/OR PEOPLE OF COLOR

 

A digitally animated drawing of a blind Japanese woman walking in an open landscape. She is in side profile, wearing a purple and light blue kimono patterned with orange flowers, and holding a stick. The background is shaded in muted browns and greens, and a pale yellow sun looms in the horizon.

Flight Paths

Part film, part video game, part history lesson, this whimsical animated choose-your-own adventure takes us into the world of ‘the Goze’, blind female travelling performers of medieval Japan. Produced by Extant, the UK’s leading company of visually impaired artists, Flight Path shares how access can be both innovative and fully integrated. Join this meditative reflection on travel, blindness and migration. Audio description is embedded into this experience.

 

Alt text: A digitally animated drawing of a blind Japanese woman walking in an open landscape. She is in side profile, wearing a purple and light blue kimono patterned with orange flowers, and holding a stick. The background is shaded in muted browns and greens, and a pale yellow sun looms in the horizon.

 

Projections of two women signing are superimposed over buildings.Sign Night

Inspired by the balcony performers of Wuhan and Lombardy during the 2020 pandemic, Sign Night is a poetic conversation between two star crossed lovers in British sign language projected onto buildings in a rugged urban landscape.

 

Alt text: Projections of two women signing are superimposed over buildings.

 

 

Illustration of a multicolored octopus, drawn with lots of blues, purples, and oranges. Text reads: Loving with Three Hearts: Behind the Scenes of the 2020 Sins Invalid Performance. SinsInvalid.org.Loving With Three Hearts

What does it take for a group of Disabled, Black, Indigenous, Queer, Trans, Non-Binary and People of Color to create a full-length theatrical production about the impacts of climate chaos on disabled people, in the midst of a pandemic? In 2020, Sins Invalid commissioned seven artists in four cities to create We Love Like Barnacles: Crip Lives in Climate Chaos, which streamed to over 1000 audience members. This labor of love explored and exposed the ways crip bodies are on the front lines of ecological disaster, and how our politics, dreams, and desires hold necessary keys for the evolution of this planet. Get a behind-the-scenes look at how it came together, and why it needed to happen.

 

Alt text: Illustration of a multicolored octopus, drawn with lots of blues, purples, and oranges. Text reads: Loving with Three Hearts: Behind the Scenes of the 2020 Sins Invalid Performance. SinsInvalid.org.

 

 

4. DISABILITY AND ACCESS AS A CREATIVE FORCE

 

 A Black man holding a lit candle at the end of a rope dances on a beach.

Still a Slave

An artistic response to many of the comments posted on social media that undermine the Black Lives Matter Movement, this arresting film integrates The Rationale Method of audio description using sound effects and spoken word. Audio description is embedded into this film.

 

Alt text: A Black man holding a lit candle at the end of a rope dances on a beach.

 

Text on a black screen reads “Lobster, a red title reads lobster.”

Lobster

In this public service announcement like no other, Cam's hungover, lost, vomit-stained, dealing with a very rude visitor, and totally in the dark. On the other hand, er, claw, she has an advantage that many Aussies can only dream about. Audio description is embedded into this film.

 

Alt text: Text on a black screen reads “Lobster, a red title reads lobster.”

 

5. INTERDEPENDENCE (AS CONTRASTED TO INDEPENDENCE)

 

A woman with Down syndrome wearing fun patterns and a vest with patches on it sits next to a drag queen on the side of the road.

Sparkles

A 37-year-old woman with Down syndrome runs away from home and embarks on journey from Kalgoorlie to Perth.

 

Alt text: A woman with Down syndrome wearing fun patterns and a vest with patches on it sits next to a drag queen on the side of the road.

 

 

6. PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES FACING DIFFICULT REAL-LIFE SITUATIONS, SUCH AS ABLEISM

 

Poster for “Yulubidyi - Until the End,” featuring an Australian Aboriginal man walking through a burning field.

Yulubidyi - Until the End

What does it mean to be a man in an Aboriginal family when your brother is disabled and your father is cruel? And how do you reconcile your brother’s clear connections to land and spirit when your father wants him, and quite possibly you, dead?

 

Alt text: Poster for “Yulubidyi - Until the End,” featuring an Australian Aboriginal man walking through a burning field.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poster for “See Through” featuring a Black woman sitting at a table. She wears a yellow shirt and has short curly hair. Text reads the film name in yellow with the film credits in white

See Through

Jessie and Brian, a young Deaf couple, recently discovered they are about to become parents. Their neighborhood coffee shop thrums with everything left unsaid, while they unearth new ways to communicate.

 

Alt text: Poster for “See Through” featuring a Black woman sitting at a table. She wears a yellow shirt and has short curly hair. Text reads the film name in yellow with the film credits in white

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7. CHARACTERS/PEOPLE WHOSE IDENTITIES ARE NOT NECESSARILY THE MAIN DRIVING FORCE OR SOURCE OF CONFLICT FOR THE PLOT

Poster for “Pew! Pew! Pew!” featuring a collage of three stills from the film, where the characters are covered in neon red light. Text reads “Pew! Pew! Pew!: A sci-fi cosplay action-comedy” in blue Star Trek font. Film credits are in white.Pew! Pew! Pew!

When Miles tries to rejoin his geeky crew at a cosplay convention, Anita is having none of it. But before she can send him packing, the devious Lord Moro ambushes the crew, forcing these old friends to reunite in an epic, cosplay "blaster" battle.

 

Alt text: Poster for “Pew! Pew! Pew!” featuring a collage of three stills from the film, where the characters are covered in neon red light. Text reads “Pew! Pew! Pew!: A sci-fi cosplay action-comedy” in blue Star Trek font. Film credits are in white.

 

 

 

 

 

Poster for “Best Summer Ever” featuring a collage of characters from the film with drawings of yellow sunflowers on top of yellow paneling. Text reads the film title.Best Summer Ever

A high school football player is shocked to discover that the new girl in school is the same girl he fell in love with at a summer dance camp.

 

Alt text: Poster for “Best Summer Ever” featuring a collage of characters from the film with drawings of yellow sunflowers on top of yellow paneling. Text reads the film title.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8. BUT ALSO, DISABILITY AS A CENTRAL SOCIAL ISSUE

 

Poster for “Innocence” featuring the three main characters, a white woman and two white men, one who has Down syndrome. Their faces are over a dead body on the ground. Text reads the film name in red and credits in white.

Innocence 

When a worker falls to his death at a care home, it appears to be a terrible accident. But when a detective questions a young man with Down syndrome spotted at the scene, they uncover a crime more shocking than anyone imagined.

 

Alt text: Poster for “Innocence” featuring the three main characters, a white woman and two white men, one who has Down syndrome. Their faces are over a dead body on the ground. Text reads the film name in red and credits in white.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black and white photograph of a wheelchair on fire in the middle of a street with a crowd around it.

Reasonable Adjustment

In the 1980s disabled terror group Reasonable Adjustment carried out a campaign of violence to gain rights - or did they?

 

Alt text: Black and white photograph of a wheelchair on fire in the middle of a street with a crowd around it.

 

 

 

9. PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES' DAY TO DAY LIVES

 

Poster for “CODA” featuring a Black woman dancing in a studio with a blue hue to it. Film title is in blue and credits are in black.

CODA

A young dancer struggles with her bi-cultural identity when she meets a confident young Deaf drummer who stirs up old conflicted feelings about growing up hearing in a Deaf family.

 

Alt text: Poster for “CODA” featuring a Black woman dancing in a studio with a blue hue to it. Film title is in blue and credits are in black.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poster for Hamburger Airplane. Text is in blue with a red drop shadow over a picture of a mounted deer head.

Hamburger Airplane

A dramedy about a Deaf loner in his lake-condo as he takes on the challenge of grilling up the perfect hamburger and confronting his traumatic past, all while using witty, passionate ASL to persuade a trophy deer.

 

Alt text: Poster for Hamburger Airplane. Text is in blue with a red drop shadow over a picture of a mounted deer head.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10. PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES AS DIRECTORS, PRODUCERS, WRITERS, AND ACTORS, TELLING THEIR OWN STORIES OR STORIES THAT ARE MEANINGFUL TO THEM PERSONALLY.

Poster for “ill, actually” featuring an illustration of someone in a wheelchair posing for a selfie, drawn in black and red. The poster’s text is also in black and red, with the tagline “Online you can be anyone. Why be ill?”

ill, actually

This short documentary explores the challenges of being young and chronically ill in a carefully curated online culture. A real life "superhero", a YouTuber and a camgirl explain why they choose to share -or hide- important parts of who they are online.

 

Alt text: Poster for “ill, actually” featuring an illustration of someone in a wheelchair posing for a selfie, drawn in black and red. The poster’s text is also in black and red, with the tagline “Online you can be anyone. Why be ill?”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poster for “An Apparition” featuring a cockroach climbing on a wall.

An Apparition

What can we learn from the most despised insects about lockdown and embodiment? This film celebrates the ingenuity of a disabled filmmaker who is grappling with the pandemic and working with the actors he had access to.

 

Alt text: Poster for “An Apparition” featuring a cockroach climbing on a wall.

 

Get your passes now at superfestfilm.com! And be sure to mark your calendars for October 15, 16, and 17th!