Exhibit Access FAQs

Q. My access needs aren't listed here, what can I do? A. Contact the Paul K. Longmore Institute at [pklinst@sfsu.edu] or (415) 405-3528.

 

Q. Do you offer guided visits for individuals or groups with particular access needs, such as Deaf people, blind people, autistic people, people with intellectual disabilities? A. Yes we do. If you'd like help scheduling a tour, contact the Paul K. Longmore Institute by email at pklinst@sfsu.edu or by phone at(415) 405-3528.

 

Q. Who did your Braille? A: Our community supporter, The LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired, San Francisco generously offered their services as a donation to the exhibit.

 

Q. Who did the audio description? A: In consultation with and some writing by the Longmore Institute, our audio description was done by an accessible media company called AudioEyes, which relies on professionals with disabilities who know "both sides" of this business and that has blind professionals review every description.

 

Q. Who did your ASL interpreting? A: The victory speeches featured at the telephone booth kiosk were interpreted by Joe Quinn with Partners in Communication. Selecting Quinn as our interpreter was no coincidence; he participated in the 504 occupation, staying in the building and volunteering as an interpreter throughout the entire sit-in. Sherry Hicks, an extraordinary artist who has developed improvisation in ASL storytelling, interpreted our mural-inspired poems and the 1977 protest songs. Read her full bio.

 

Q. Do you consult with organizations interested in thinking creatively about access, beyond compliance? A: Yes we do! We have learned so much during this process and are eager to share our experiences. Please email the Paul K. Longmore Institute at pklinst@sfsu.edu or call (415) 405-3528.

 

Q. What does "competing accommodations" mean? A: "Competing accommodations" refers to when the completely valid needs of two people or groups conflict with one another and sometimes even cancel each other out. For example, the curb cut-outs that make it so easy for wheelchair riders to get around pose challenges for blind travelers who rely on curbs to know when they're in the street. Sometimes there are compromises: that's why curb cuts have the bumpy yellow domes. But other times, such as when one person needs lights to be bright in order to see and another needs them dim so they aren't over-stimulated, it's harder. Even when compromise seems impossible, good conversations can result. Not every part of the exhibit can be accessible to everyone all the time, but we aimed for balance.

 

Q. How can I help your access efforts for this and other events? A: We're always trying to push the boundaries and provoke new thinking. Contact us with your ideas, and don’t forget to support the Longmore Institute's many endeavors. Your contributions will be especially critical as we take our access messages to more people through our education and outreach programs.